Space Travel News  





. Where Is The Coldest Point In The Universe

The illustration shows the microwave background radiation as mapped by the WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) spacecraft. It is measured coming almost completely uniformly from every direction of space with a temperature of approximately minus 270 degrees Celsius. The different colours show the minimal deviations from this temperature. Credit: NASA/WMAP Science Team.
by Staff Writers
Bonn, Germany (SPX) Mar 13, 2009
The entire Universe is saturated with what is known as microwave background radiation, a remnant of the Big Bang. Microwaves are electromagnetic waves - just like visible light. However, microwaves have wavelengths between one metre and one millimetre (= one thousandth of a metre), while the wavelength of light lies between 380 and 780 nanometres (= one thousandth of one millionth of a metre).

After the Big Bang, the formation of matter, space and time out of virtually nothing, the prevailing temperatures were at first almost inconceivably high. However, as the Universe expanded the temperature sank - to approximately minus 270 degrees Celsius, the temperature that it is today.

The expansion of space also lengthened the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation until it entered the microwave range of between one metre and one millimetre.

Today, this radiation can be measured reaching us evenly from all directions of space - thus the term 'background radiation'. It would 'heat up' any colder object to the space temperature of minus 270 degrees Celsius.

The microwave background radiation ensures an even 'space climate'

Can the Universe still be colder in some places? Yes, when they are shielded and actively cooled. This is because absolute zero, the lowest temperature theoretically possible, is minus 273 degrees Celsius - approximately a further three degrees lower than the temperature in space.

This lowest temperature is reached to within a few millionths of a degree in the laboratories of low-temperature physicists, where matter is cooled using complex processes.

For this reason, the coldest point in the Universe is on the Earth - providing there is no extra-terrestrial civilisation in whose laboratories temperatures are attained that are even closer to absolute zero.

Related Links
German Aerospace Center
Space Tourism, Space Transport and Space Exploration News




Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
Where Is The Coldest Point In The Universe
Bonn, Germany (SPX) Mar 13, 2009
The entire Universe is saturated with what is known as microwave background radiation, a remnant of the Big Bang. Microwaves are electromagnetic waves - just like visible light. However, microwaves have wavelengths between one metre and one millimetre (= one thousandth of a metre), while the wavelength of light lies between 380 and 780 nanometres (= one thousandth of one millionth of a metre).

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  



The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright Space.TV Corporation. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space.TV Corp on any Web page published or hosted by Space.TV Corp. Privacy Statement