Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Travel News .

SpaceX cargo ship arrives at International Space Station
by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) Sept 23, 2014

SpaceX's unmanned Dragon spacecraft arrived at the International Space Station on Tuesday with a cargo of supplies, including freeze-dried meals, 20 live lab mice and a 3D printer.

Astronauts at the orbiting lab reached out with the space station's robotic arm to grasp the Dragon at 6:52 am (1052 GMT), NASA said.

Germany's Alexander Gerst, an astronaut from the European Space Agency, operated the 57.7-foot (17.6-meter) robotic arm to capture the Dragon, and was assisted by NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman.

The berthing operation was completed at 9:21 am (1321 GMT) when the vessel latched fully onto the research outpost.

The Dragon capsule is carrying more than 5,000 pounds (2,200 kilograms) of food, clothing, spare parts, exercise equipment, science experiments, a small satellite and a tool to measure wind speed at the ocean's surface.

The spacecraft launched early Sunday from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and is SpaceX's fourth contracted mission with NASA for supply trips to the ISS and back.

The crew is scheduled to begin unloading the capsule on Wednesday.

The lab mice are the first live mammals to hitch a ride aboard a commercial cargo ship, and they are enclosed in a NASA-made research cage for studying the effects of weightlessness on their bodies.

The 3D printer is the first of its kind to demonstrate how the technology can be used in space, even without gravity to assist the process.

The spacecraft will stay at the ISS for about a month as astronauts unload its cargo and repack it with 3,200 pounds (1,450 kilograms) of material to return to Earth.

In 2010, SpaceX became the first private company to send a spacecraft to the ISS.

The company is run by Internet mogul Elon Musk, who accumulated his fortune by co-founding PayPal. He also runs Tesla Motors.

Orbital Sciences Corporation has also contracted with NASA to send its Cygnus cargo ship to the space station, but unlike the Dragon, which can return to Earth intact, the Cygnus burns up on re-entry to Earth's atmosphere.

Last week, SpaceX was awarded a $2 billion contract from NASA to continue developing its Dragon V2 vehicle with the goal of sending people to the space station as early as 2017.

Boeing won a larger NASA contract, for more than $4 billion, for the development of its CST-100 crew vehicle.

NASA lost its ability to reach the space station when the shuttle program ended in 2011 after 30 years.

The US space agency has helped fund private companies in the race to restore US access to the ISS.

In the meantime, the world's astronauts must rely on Russia's Soyuz spacecraft to get to the ISS and back, at a cost of $70 million per seat.


Related Links
Station at NASA
Station and More at Roscosmos
S.P. Korolev RSC Energia
Watch NASA TV via Space.TV
Space Station News at Space-Travel.Com

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Yeast, the final frontier
Vancouver, Canada (SPX) Sep 23, 2014
Every brewmaster and baker knows that yeast rises. But, as UBC associate professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences Corey Nislow will tell you, some yeast rises way, way above the rest. This month, special yeast strains developed by Nislow's team will dock at the International Space Station, shuttled there by SpaceX, the private spacecraft company contracted by NASA to deliver cargo. Once aboard ... read more

SpaceX is not only taking a 3D printer to space, but mice too

United Launch Alliance Launches Its 60th Mission from Cape Canaveral

Lockheed Martin-built CLIO Satellite Launched From Cape Canaveral

SpaceX cargo ship arrives at International Space Station

NASA's MAVEN spacecraft enters Mars orbit

Why India went to Mars

Two Martian Probes Set to Orbit Red Planet

India to enter Mars orbit on September 24

Lunar explorers will walk at higher speeds than thought

Year's final supermoon is a Harvest Moon

China Aims for the Moon, Plans to Bring Back Lunar Soil

Electric Sparks May Alter Evolution of Lunar Soil

Miranda: An Icy Moon Deformed by Tidal Heating

Awaiting New Results on Pluto's Atmosphere

New Horizons Crosses Neptune Orbit On Route To First Pluto Flyby

From Pinpoint of Light to a Geologic World

Chandra Finds Planet That Makes Star Act Deceptively Old

Solar System Simulation Reveals Planetary Mystery

'Hot Jupiters' provoke their own host suns to wobble

First evidence for water ice clouds found outside solar system

Amazon founder strikes deal to build US rocket engines

Analyst: US to Finish Human Space Launcher by 2018 at Best

Boeing, SpaceX to send astronauts to space station

Space Launch System Will Use Massive Welding Tool

Astronauts eye China's future space station

China eyes working with other nations as station plans develop

China completes construction of advanced space launch facility

China to launch second space lab in 2016: official

Dawn Operating Normally After Safe Mode Triggered

'J' marks the spot for Rosetta's lander

'J' marks the spot for historic comet landing

A Map of Rosetta's Comet

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.