Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Travel News .




LAUNCH PAD
Nasa readies satellite to measure atmospheric CO2
by Staff Writers
Washington (AFP) June 13, 2014


NASA is preparing a July 1 launch for its first satellite dedicated to measuring atmospheric levels of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas that plays a key role in climate change.

CO2 levels have reached their highest point in at least 800,000 years, according to the US space agency.

The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite is very similar to its predecessor, OCO-1, which was destroyed during its launch in February 2009.

The satellite will help provide a more complete and global picture of man-made and naturally occurring CO2 emissions as well as the effects of carbon "sinks," like oceans and forests, which absorb and trap the gas.

"Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere plays a critical role in our planet's energy balance and is a key factor in understanding how our climate is changing," said Michael Freilich, director of NASA's Earth Science Division.

"With the OCO-2 mission, NASA will be contributing an important new source of global observations to the scientific challenge of better understanding our Earth and its future," he added in a statement.

The OCO-2 satellite will be launched on a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, aiming for an orbit at 438 miles (705 kilometers) above the Earth's surface.

NASA envisions it becoming the lead satellite for a six-strong fleet that will circle the Earth every 99 minutes, allowing nearly simultaneous observations across the globe.

OCO-2, designed to operate for at least two years, will take measurements of carbon emissions and carbon sinks around the world to help scientists analyze how they change over time.

In April, monthly concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere surpassed 400 particles per million in the northern hemisphere, which NASA said was the highest level in at least the past 800,000 years.

Human activities -- including the burning of fossil fuels like oil, natural gas and coal -- are blamed for emitting nearly 40 billion tonnes of CO2 in the atmosphere each year, leading to an unprecedented accumulation of the greenhouse gas.

Climate scientists have concluded that the increase of CO2 emissions from human activities, especially from fossil fuels and deforestation, have upset the planet's natural carbon cycle, prompting rising temperatures and planet-wide climate change.

Currently, less than half of the CO2 emitted by human activities remains in the atmosphere, scientists say.

Measurements of CO2 levels taken by the new satellite will be combined with data obtained by land-based observatories, airplanes and other satellites.

.


Related Links
Launch Pad at Space-Travel.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





LAUNCH PAD
Russian Soyuz-2.1b rocket to undergo final testing
Moscow (Voice of Russia) Jun 13, 2014
Russia's Aerospace Defense Forces proceeded to the final cycle of prelaunch tests of Soyuz-2.1b carrier rocket, installed onto the Plesetsk State Testing Cosmodrome, spokesman for Russiaa's Aerospace Defense Forces Colonel Alexei Zolotukhin told RIA Novosti. "On Thursday, June 12, Plesetsk Cosmodrome specialists rolled out Soyuz-2.1b carrier rocket onto the launch pad a?? 43, where personn ... read more


LAUNCH PAD
Nasa readies satellite to measure atmospheric CO2

Arianespace A World Leader In The Satellite Launch Market

Airbus Group and Safran To Join Forces in Launcher Activities

US not able yet to remove dependency on Russian rocket motors

LAUNCH PAD
Discovery of Earth's Northernmost Perennial Spring

US Congress and Obama administration face obstacles in Mars 2030 project

Opportunity Recovering From Flash Memory Problems

Rover Corrects its Spacecraft Clock

LAUNCH PAD
Solar photons drive water off the moon

55-year old dark side of the moon mystery solved

New evidence supporting moon formation via collision of 2 planets

NASA Missions Let Scientists See Moon's Dancing Tide From Orbit

LAUNCH PAD
Cracks in Pluto's Moon Could Indicate it Once Had an Underground Ocean

Hubble Begins Search Beyond Pluto For Potential Flyby Targets

Final Pre-Pluto Annual Checkout Begins

Assessing Pluto from Afar

LAUNCH PAD
Kepler space telescope ready to start new hunt for exoplanets

Astronomers Confounded By Massive Rocky World

Two planets orbit nearby ancient star

First light for SPHERE exoplanet imager

LAUNCH PAD
ULA Signs Multiple Contracts for Next-Gen Propulsion Work

Why We Need Rocket Engines

NASA again delays flying saucer test

Orion Ready To Feel The Heat

LAUNCH PAD
Chinese lunar rover alive but weak

China's Jade Rabbit moon rover 'alive but struggling'

Chinese space team survives on worm diet for 105 days

Moon rover Yutu comes closer to public

LAUNCH PAD
The Role Of Amateur Astronomers In Rosetta's Mission

Giant Telescopes Pair Up to Image Near-Earth Asteroid

NASA Instruments on Rosetta Start Comet Science

Asteroid Discovered by NASA to Pass Earth Safely




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.