. Space Travel News .

NASA Conducts New Parachute Test for Orion
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Mar 05, 2012

A test model of the Orion spacecraft with its parachutes was tested high above the skies over Arizona on Feb. 29. This particular drop test examined the wake - or the disturbance of the air flow behind Orion - that is caused by the spacecraft. This was the latest in a series of parachute drop tests conducted by NASA at the U.S. Army's Proving Grounds in Yuma, Ariz. Credit: NASA

On Feb. 29, NASA successfully conducted another drop test of the Orion crew vehicle's entry, descent and landing parachutes high above the Arizona desert in preparation for the vehicle's orbital flight test in 2014.

Orion will carry astronauts deeper into space than ever before, provide emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and ensure a safe re-entry and landing.

An Air Force C-17 plane dropped a test version of Orion from an altitude of 25,000 feet above the U.S. Army's Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona.

Orion's drogue chutes were deployed between 15,000 and 20,000 feet, followed by the pilot parachutes, which deployed the main landing parachutes. Orion landed on the desert floor at a speed of almost 17 mph, well below the maximum designed touchdown speed of the spacecraft.

The test examined how Orion's wake, the disturbance of the air flow behind the vehicle, would affect the performance of the parachute system.

Parachutes perform optimally in smooth air that allows proper lift. A wake of choppy air can reduce parachute inflation.

The test was the first to create a wake mimicking the full-size Orion vehicle and complete system.

Since 2007, the Orion program has conducted a vigorous parachute air and ground test program and provided the chutes for NASA's successful pad abort test in 2010.

All of the tests build an understanding of the chutes' technical performance for eventual human-rated certification.

Related Links
Space Tourism, Space Transport and Space Exploration News

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries

And it's 3... 2... 1... blastoff! Discover the thrill of a real-life rocket launch.


. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Workers Remove Apollo-era Engines from Crawler at VAB
Cape Canaveral FL (SPX) Mar 05, 2012
For more than 30 years, NASA's two Apollo-era crawler-transporters carried six space shuttles (Atlantis, Challenger, Columbia, Discovery, Endeavour and Enterprise) atop mobile launcher platforms from the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) to Launch Complex 39 at Kennedy Space Center. After traveling 2,190 miles, crawler-transporter 2 (CT-2), which weighs about six million pounds, will receive ... read more

Lockheed Martin Selects Alaska's Kodiak Launch Complex To Support Future Athena Launches

The initial Ariane 5 for launch in 2012 completes its final assembly

Arianespace maintains its open dialog with the space insurance sector

SwRI and XCOR agree to pioneering research test flight missions

Slight Cleaning of Opportunity Mars Rover Solar Panels

Surface of Mars an unlikely place for life after 600 million year drought

Camera on NASA Mars Odyssey Tops Decade of Discovery

Proposed Mars Mission Has New Name

Scientists Shed Light On Lunar Impact History

China paces to the Moon

SD-built camera spots tiny shifts on moon

Back to the Moon A Modern Redux

New Horizons on Approach: 22 AU Down, Just 10 to Go

Researchers say galaxy may swarm with 'nomad planets'

New model provides different take on planetary accretion

A Planetary Exo-splosion

Extending the Habitable Zone for Red Dwarf Stars

XCOR Aerospace Closes $5 Million Round of Investment Capital

XCOR Announces New Lynx Vehicle Payload Integrators

Future of Space Transportation

Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne Successfully Completes J-2X Powerpack Test

Logistics, recycling key to China's space station

China prepares for manned space docking this year

No Sleep for Shenzhou 9 Mission to Tiangong 1

Experiments going smoothly on Tiangong-1

Asteroid 2011 AG5 - A Reality Check

Scientists say big asteroid bears watching

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement