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Lockheed Martin Names New Leader for Commercial Launch Services Business
by Staff Writers
Denver CO (SPX) Apr 19, 2012

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Lockheed Martin has announced that Robert Cleave has been named president of Lockheed Martin Commercial Launch Services (LMCLS) effective May 1, 2012. Cleave succeeds Jack Zivic who is retiring at the end of April following 28 years of service with the company.

In his new role, Cleave will lead and expand the company's launch services business encompassing sales, marketing, contracting and mission management for the commercial Atlas and Athena family of launch vehicles. He will report directly to John Karas, vice president and general manager of Human Space Flight at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company.

"Robert brings outstanding leadership with over 25 years of experience in the satellite industry and will provide an increased focus on strategy, growth and innovative solutions to meet the needs of satellite customers worldwide," said John Karas.

"Our customers need affordable, assured and reliable lift to meet the current and projected demands of the satellite industry during a time of economic pressures. Robert has a strong understanding of the commercial marketplace and how to create innovative, affordable solutions for our customers.

His knowledge of the industry spans communications, science and remote sensing satellites for both government and commercial needs, which will help expand our position in the launch services market."

Lockheed Martin offers Atlas and Athena commercial launch services and is responsible for contracts, marketing, sales and mission management for commercial and international government Atlas missions and all Athena missions.

LMCLS subcontracts to United Launch Alliance for Atlas launch vehicles and launch support services. With over 50 years of demonstrated launch capability and reliability and 100 consecutive successful launches, Atlas vehicles can lift single and multiple payloads in the intermediate and large payload class weighing up to 8,900 kg (19,600 lbs.) to geotransfer orbit and 18,800 kg (41,400 lbs.) to low Earth orbit.

LMCLS's backlog includes Atlas launch services for the GeoEye, Inc., GeoEye-2 satellite scheduled for launch in 2013 and DigitalGlobe's WorldView-3 satellite scheduled for launch in 2014, both on Atlas V 401 launch vehicles.

For small to medium payloads, Lockheed Martin and ATK are actively marketing the flight-proven family of Athena launch vehicles to provide reliable launch services for single payloads as well as shared rides for multiple payloads.

Athena II can lift up to 3,775 lbs. (1,712 kg) to low Earth orbit. Utilizing a 92-inch diameter payload fairing, the vehicle accommodates a wide range of satellites and missions designed to launch government defense and civil related orbital satellites, including a proven capability to launch satellites into lunar orbit.

Last year, Lockheed Martin and ATK announced their intent to offer Athena II services with a ride-share launch from Alaska's Kodiak Launch Complex (KLC) in late 2013.

The company recently selected KLC as its dedicated West Coast launch facility as it looks to expand launch capability with Athena III for commercial and government customers.

Utilizing the Athena I and II as the upper stages and another ATK solid rocket motor as the first stage, Athena III will be capable of launching satellites weighing 4,600 kg (10,150 lbs.) from Alaska and 5,900 kg (13, 000 lbs.) from the Florida space coast.

ATK draws on a long heritage of commercial rocket motors, including the CASTOR 120 and CASTOR 30 for the Athena II, as well as over 1,500 commercial rocket motors that ATK has produced since 1988.

Previously, Cleave served as director of new business solutions at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company focused on developing adjacent and horizontal business opportunities, and as director of business development for Global Communications Systems, responsible for $1.5 billion in annual sales related to satellite communication networks.

Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Cleave served as vice president for business development and strategic planning for XTAR, an international joint venture focused on providing X-band services to government agencies.

His early career included engineering responsibilities at Rockwell International Space Systems Division, where he worked on a variety of programs for the Air Force and NASA, becoming the company's youngest chief systems engineer and creating an innovative public-private partnership with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Cleave holds a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering from Arizona State University and a master's certificate in systems engineering from the University of Southern California. He also serves on several non-profit boards, including the newly created Hosted Payload Alliance.

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