Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Travel News .




ROCKET SCIENCE
Boeing Delivers First Space Launch System Hardware to NASA
by Staff Writers
Huntsville AL (SPX) Jun 05, 2012


File image.

Boeing has delivered NASA three flight computer software test beds, the first critical element for flight software development in support of NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). Flight software controls the launch vehicle during preflight tanking operations and in flight.

The test beds were delivered on April 25, ahead of schedule, to the Software Development Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville. They are now being integrated with NASA's application software.

"These are the most capable flight computers ever developed for human spaceflight," said Dane Richardson, manager for the Boeing SLS Avionics and Software Team.

"They have the highest processing capability available in a flight computer and triple modular redundant processors. The technology is proven from years of satellite applications, and it's reliable enough to take SLS beyond Earth's orbit."

In triple modular redundant processing, three processors within each flight computer interpret the data, then "vote" to be sure they all agree on the response before sending that solution from the computer. The three flight computers on the vehicle then compare those answers and send commands to the vehicle for execution.

"The triple redundant processors make each computer reliable in the harsh radiation environment. Similarly, the three computers working in concert make the vehicle reliable," explained Richardson. "The configuration is called the flight computer operating group."

"Delivering NASA the flight computer software test beds early gives them more time to develop the most capable flight software for SLS," said Jim Chilton, vice president for Boeing Exploration Launch Systems and SLS program manager.

"The Boeing SLS avionics team will continue to work closely with NASA to ensure seamless integration of NASA software and the Boeing hardware and operating system as we move forward in rocket design and development."

In 2011, NASA executed a contract modification that changed existing Upper Stage Production and Instrument Unit Avionics contracts into a single contract for design, development and production of the cryogenic stages and avionics for SLS.

SLS will provide an entirely new capability for human exploration beyond Earth orbit. With its ability to conduct both crew and cargo missions, it also will back up commercial and international-partner transportation services to the International Space Station.

Under NASA's phased development plan for SLS, Boeing is designing the two cryogenic stages concurrently to maximize the affordability of rocket development and operations.

The initial flight-test configuration, scheduled to fly in 2017, will provide a 70-metric ton capacity using only the first stage. The complete two-stage vehicle configuration will provide a lift capability of more than 130 metric tons to enable missions beyond Earth orbit and support deep space exploration.

.


Related Links
Boeing
Rocket Science News at Space-Travel.Com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ROCKET SCIENCE
Sierra Nevada Announces the Completion of Four Dream Chaser Milestones FOR NASA
Sparks, NV (SPX) Jun 01, 2012
Sierra Nevada Corporation's (SNC) Space Systems announces that the Dream Chaser Space System has successfully completed four additional NASA Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) Program Milestones. The four Milestones included: Separation System Testing, Flight Article Main Landing Gear Drop Testing, Captive Carry Interface Testing, and a Captive Carry Flight Test Readiness Review. ... read more


ROCKET SCIENCE
Boeing Receives DARPA Airborne Satellite Launch Study Contract

Sea Launch Delivers the Intelsat 19 Spacecraft into Orbit

SpaceX Dragon capsule splash lands in Pacific

US cargo ship on return voyage from space station

ROCKET SCIENCE
Wind may have driven avalanches on Martian dunes

On The Hunt For Light-Toned Veins Of Gypsum

Mars missions may learn from meteor Down Under

Waking Up with the Sun's Rays

ROCKET SCIENCE
UA Lunar-Mining Team Wins National Contest

NASA Lunar Spacecraft Complete Prime Mission Ahead of Schedule

NASA Offers Guidelines To Protect Historic Sites On The Moon

Neil Armstrong gives rare interview - to accountant

ROCKET SCIENCE
It's a Sim: Out in Deep Space, New Horizons Practices the 2015 Pluto Encounter

Beyond Pluto And Exploring the Kuiper Belt

Uranus auroras glimpsed from Earth

Herschel images extrasolar analogue of the Kuiper Belt

ROCKET SCIENCE
Tiny Planet-Finding Mirrors Borrow from Webb Telescope Playbook

Astronomers Probe 'Evaporating' Planet Around Nearby Star with Hobby-Eberly Telescope

Venus transit may boost hunt for other worlds

NSO To Use Venus Transit To Fine-Tune Search For Other Worlds

ROCKET SCIENCE
Dream Chaser Flight Vehicle Scales Rocky Mountain Summits

Boeing Delivers First Space Launch System Hardware to NASA

Sierra Nevada Announces the Completion of Four Dream Chaser Milestones FOR NASA

J-2X Engine Continues to Set Standards

ROCKET SCIENCE
What will China's Taikonauts do aboard Tiangong 1?

Why is China sending a woman into space?

China launches telecommunication satellite

Tiangong 1 Ready To Meet Shenzhou 9

ROCKET SCIENCE
Dawn deep in the asteroid belt orbiting Vesta

UT's Josh Emery Uncovers Clues About Asteroid That Will Pass Near Earth

Rosetta flyby uncovers the complex history of asteroid Lutetia

OSIRIS-REx Scientists Measure Yarkovsky Effect




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement