Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Travel News .




ENERGY TECH
A new step towards using graphene in electronic applications
by Staff Writers
Leioa, Spain (SPX) Jan 15, 2015


A) This image is a diagram of molecular precursors, the resulting graphene nanoribbons and the heterostructured ones. (B) Tunnel microscopy images of the heterostructures synthesized on gold surfaces. Image courtesy UPV/EHU.

Few materials have received as much attention from the scientific world or have raised so many hopes with a view to their potential deployment in new applications as graphene has.

This is largely due to its superlative properties: it is the thinnest material in existence, almost transparent, the strongest, the stiffest and at the same time the most strechable, the best thermal conductor, the one with the highest intrinsic charge carrier mobility, plus many more fascinating features.

Specifically, its electronic properties can vary enormously through its confinement inside nanostructured systems, for example. That is why ribbons or rows of graphene with nanometric widths are emerging as tremendously interesting electronic components.

On the other hand, due to the great variability of electronic properties upon minimal changes in the structure of these nanoribbons, exact control on an atomic level is an indispensable requirement to make the most of all their potential.

The lithographic techniques used in conventional nanotechnology do not yet have such resolution and precision. In the year 2010, however, a way was found to synthesise nanoribbons with atomic precision by means of the so-called molecular self-assembly.

Molecules designed for this purpose are deposited onto a surface in such a way that they react with each other and give rise to perfectly specified graphene nanoribbons by means of a highly reproducible process and without any other external mediation than heating to the required temperature.

In 2013 a team of scientists from the University of Berkeley and the Centre for Materials Physics (CFM), a mixed CSIC (Spanish National Research Council) and UPV/EHU (University of the Basque Country) centre, extended this very concept to new molecules that were forming wider graphene nanoribbons and therefore with new electronic properties.

This same group has now managed to go a step further by creating, through this self-assembly, heterostructures that blend segments of graphene nanoribbons of two different widths.

The forming of heterostructures with different materials has been a concept widely used in electronic engineering and has enabled huge advances to be made in conventional electronics.

"We have now managed for the first time to form heterostructures of graphene nanoribbons modulating their width on a molecular level with atomic precision. What is more, their subsequent characterisation by means of scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy, complemented with first principles theoretical calculations, has shown that it gives rise to a system with very interesting electronic properties which include, for example, the creation of what are known as quantum wells," pointed out the scientist Dimas de Oteyza, who has participated in this project.

This work, the results of which are being published this very week in the prestigious journal Nature Nanotechnology, therefore constitutes a significant success towards the desired deployment of graphene in commercial electronic applications.

Dr Dimas G. de Oteyza, who was previously at Berkeley and at the CFM, is currently working at the Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC) as a Fellow Gipuzkoa.

The Fellows Gipuzkoa programme, funded by the Chartered Provincial Council of Gipuzkoa, is in fact devoted to bringing back young researchers with solid post-doctoral training in internationally prestigious groups and centres, by offering them a platform for reincorporation through contracts with a duration of up to five years, which enables them to compete in the best of conditions to obtain tenured positions as researchers in our country.


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
University of the Basque Country
Powering The World in the 21st Century at Energy-Daily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





ENERGY TECH
New superconducting hybrid crystals developed at Copenhagen
Copenhagen, Denmark (SPX) Jan 13, 2015
A new type of 'nanowire' crystals that fuses semiconducting and metallic materials on the atomic scale could lay the foundation for future semiconducting electronics. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen are behind the breakthrough, which has great potential. The development and quality of extremely small electronic circuits are critical to how and how well future computers and othe ... read more


ENERGY TECH
Google aboard as Musk's SpaceX gets $1 bn in funding

Client Pauses Launch of Proton Rocket Carrying British Satellite

Russian firm seals $1 billion deal to supply US rocket engines

Soyuz Installed at Baikonur, Expected to Launch Wednesday

ENERGY TECH
Lost and found in space: Beagle 2 seen on Mars 11 years on

Students to Send Life to Mars Onboard Mars One Lander in 2018

UA-led HiRISE camera spots long-lost space probe on Mars

Team Working on Strategy to Fix Flash Memory Issue

ENERGY TECH
Service Module of Chinese Probe Enters Lunar Orbit

Service module of China's lunar orbiter enters 127-minute orbit

Chinese spacecraft to return to moon's orbit

Russian Company Proposes to Build Lunar Base

ENERGY TECH
Two Earth-sized planets hidden at the edge of our Solar System

NASA's New Horizons probe begins Pluto observations

Maybe two more planets in our Solar System: astronomers

New Horizons ready for planet's beyond beyond

ENERGY TECH
Planetary building blocks evolved from porous to hard objects

Telescope To Seek Dust Where Other Earths May Lie

Three-Planet System Holds Clues to Atmospheres of Earth-size Worlds

Three nearly Earth-size planets found orbiting nearby star

ENERGY TECH
Russia Could Export 30 More Rocket Engines to US

Watch SpaceX nearly land rocket on floating barge

Watch NASA test the newest space launch system rocket engine

Alaskan sounding rocket studies role of solar wind on Earth's atmosphere

ENERGY TECH
China launches the FY-2 08 meteorological satellite successfully

China's Long March puts satellite in orbit on 200th launch

Countdown to China's new space programs begins

China develops new rocket for manned moon mission: media

ENERGY TECH
Dawn Delivers New Image of Ceres

Europe comet mission deserves Nobel: space chief

NEOWISE: A Yearlong Look at the Sky

Meteorite material born in molten spray as embryo planets collided




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.