Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Space Travel News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



CHIP TECH
A new class of materials could realize quantum computers
by Staff Writers
Lausanne, Switzerland (SPX) Oct 31, 2016


File image.

Scientists at EPFL and PSI have discovered a new class of materials that can prove ideal for the implementation of spintronics. Electron spin generally refers to the rotation of electrons around their axis. In a material electrons also orbit the atom's nucleus. When these two electron motions, spin and orbit interact, they locally produce a very strong magnetic field. As such, spin is used in MRI, NMR spectroscopy, and hard drives.

Spintronics, an emerging field of technology, explores spin-orbit interactions to develop a new generation of power-saving electronics and high-capacity memory cells. Publishing in Nature Communications, scientists at EPFL and the Swiss Light Source (PSI) have now identified a new class of materials whose electronic properties can prove ideal for spintronics.

In a classical picture spin exists in either of two directions: "up" or "down", which can be described respectively as the clockwise or counter-clockwise rotation of the electron around its axis. However, the full picture is even more fascinating; the spin is a quantum property of the electron and can thus be in a superposition of up and down. Similar to the picture of Schrodingers cat being alive and dead at the same time. This makes a controllable spin state also a promising aspect for quantum computers.

Hugo Dil at EPFL together with Juraj Krempasky and Vladimir Strocov at the Paul Scherrer Institute led a study on the electronic and spin structure of a material made of Germanium and Tellurium (GeTe) and doped with Manganese (Mn).

It belongs to the small class of multiferroic materials where (ferro)magnetic and (ferro)electric properties are directly coupled. In this material the combination of spin-orbit interaction and magnetism produces some exotic properties which were sought for by researchers world wide, but no for the first time are experimentally identified.

For their study, the researchers used thin films of the GeTe material, each about 200 nm thick. The researchers used a technique called photoemission, which uses the photoelectric effect predicted by Einstein and with which Dil's lab has longstanding expertise.

The study revealed the intertwined nature of the electric and magnetic properties of the new class of materials, which are termed "multiferroic Rashba semiconductors" (Rashba refers to the type of spin separation).

"In multiferroic materials the electric and magnetic properties are directly linked," explains Hugo Dil. "So when we switch one the other is affected too, which paves the way to future spintronic devices, since we can switch the magnetic orientation using just a small electrical field."

On a more fundamental level, the GeTe compound used in this study shows that the electric and magnetic polarization are exactly antiparallel, unlike the few other known multiferroic materials. Furthermore, the properties extend throughout the whole of the material and are not confined to a small region.

This has far-reaching implications for the way its electronic states are structured. As Hugo Dil explains: "In this case the electronic structure is similar to that of topological insulators, but then in 3D. Exactly this property forms the basis for the formation of Majorana particles to be used in quantum computers."

Krempasky J, Muff S, Bisti F, Fanciulli M, Volfova H, Weber A, Pilet N, Warnicke P, Ebert H, Braun J, Bertran F, Volobuiev VVV, Minar J, Springholz G, Dil JH, Strocov VN. Entanglement and manipulation of the magnetic and spin-orbit order in multiferroic Rashba semiconductors. Nature Communications 21 October 2016. DOI: 10.1038/NCOMMS13071


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

.


Related Links
Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
CHIP TECH
Future information technologies: Magnetic monopoles
Berlin, Germany (SPX) Oct 31, 2016
The new materials system consists of regular arrays of superconducting YBaCuO-dots covered with an extremely thin permalloy film. A shortly applied external magnetic field leads to the creation of supercurrents within the superconducting dots. These currents produce a complex magnetic field pattern, which is inscribed into the permalloy film above. The results are published in Advanced Science. ... read more


CHIP TECH
Antares Rides Again

Four Galileo satellites are "topped off" for Arianespace's milestone Ariane 5 launch from the Spaceport

US-Russia Standoff Leaves NASA Without Manned Launch Capabilities

Swedish Space Corporation Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Esrange Space Center

CHIP TECH
Did it crash or land? Search on for Europe's Mars craft

Rover Conducting Science Investigations at 'Spirit Mount'

MAVEN mission observes ups and downs of water escape from Mars

A graveyard of broken dreams and landers

CHIP TECH
Russia plans to revive lunar rover moon exploration program

Small impacts are reworking the moon's soil faster than scientists thoug

2016 Ends with Three Supermoons

Spectacular Lunar Grazing Occultation of Bright Star on Oct. 18

CHIP TECH
Uranus may have two undiscovered moons

Possible Clouds on Pluto, Next Target is Reddish

Curious tilt of the Sun traced to undiscovered planet

Shedding light on Pluto's glaciers

CHIP TECH
Tatooine worlds orbiting 2 suns often survive violent escapades of aging stars

Oldest known planet-forming disk found

ALMA spots possible formation site of icy giant planet

Astronomers find oldest known planetary disk

CHIP TECH
Boosting Europe's all-electric satellites

Guiding Supply Ship to the International Space Station

The Pressure is On for SLS Hardware in Upcoming Test

First launch for Orbital's Antares rocket since '14 blast

CHIP TECH
China to enhance space capabilities with launch of Shenzhou-11

Ambitious space satellite projects set for liftoff

China's permanent station plans ride on mission

China to enhance space capabilities with launch of Shenzhou-11

CHIP TECH
Astronomers Predict Birthplace of Rosetta's Comet

Unexpected discoveries on a metal world

Avalanches, Not Internal Pressure, Cause Comet Outbursts

Study suggests comet strike's link to age-old warming event




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement