Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Space Travel News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



CHIP TECH
A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics
by Staff Writers
Madison WI (SPX) Oct 10, 2017


Literal flexibility may bring the power of a new transistor developed at UW-Madison to digital devices that bend and move.

A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world - and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level.

It's an advance that could open the door to an increasingly interconnected world, enabling manufacturers to add "smart," wireless capabilities to any number of large or small products or objects - like wearable sensors and computers for people and animals - that curve, bend, stretch and move.

Transistors are ubiquitous building blocks of modern electronics. The UW-Madison group's advance is a twist on a two-decade-old industry standard: a BiCMOS (bipolar complementary metal oxide semiconductor) thin-film transistor, which combines two very different technologies - and speed, high current and low power dissipation in the form of heat and wasted energy - all on one surface.

As a result, these "mixed-signal" devices (with both analog and digital capabilities) deliver both brains and brawn and are the chip of choice for many of today's portable electronic devices, including cellphones.

"The industry standard is very good," says Zhenqiang (Jack) Ma, the Lynn H. Matthias Professor and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in electrical and computer engineering at UW-Madison. "Now we can do the same things with our transistor - but it can bend."

Ma is a world leader in high-frequency flexible electronics. He and his collaborators described their advance in the inaugural issue of the journal Flexible Electronics, published Sept. 27.

Making traditional BiCMOS flexible electronics is difficult, in part because the process takes several months and requires a multitude of delicate, high-temperature steps. Even a minor variation in temperature at any point could ruin all of the previous steps.

Ma and his collaborators fabricated their flexible electronics on a single-crystal silicon nanomembrane on a single bendable piece of plastic. The secret to their success is their unique process, which eliminates many steps and slashes both the time and cost of fabricating the transistors.

"In industry, they need to finish these in three months," he says. "We finished it in a week."

He says his group's much simpler high-temperature process can scale to industry-level production right away.

"The key is that parameters are important," he says. "One high-temperature step fixes everything - like glue. Now, we have more powerful mixed-signal tools. Basically, the idea is for flexible electronics to expand with this. The platform is getting bigger."

CHIP TECH
Columbia engineers invent breakthrough millimeter-wave circulator IC
New York, NY (SPX) Oct 09, 2017
Columbia Engineering researchers, led by Harish Krishnaswamy, associate professor of electrical engineering, in collaboration with Professor Andrea Alu's group from UT-Austin, continue to break new ground in developing magnet-free non-reciprocal components in modern semiconductor processes. At the IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference in February, Krishnaswamy's group unveiled a new ... read more

Related Links
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Computer Chip Architecture, Technology and Manufacture
Nano Technology News From SpaceMart.com


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

CHIP TECH
CHIP TECH
Lockheed Martin Reveals New Details to its Mars Base Camp Vision

Fresh Look at Old Data Yields Surprise Near Martian Equator

Methane belches kept water flowing on ancient Mars

Large Solar Storm Sparks Global Aurora and Doubles Radiation Levels on the Martian Surface

CHIP TECH
Chinese moon missions delayed by rocket failure: report

Moon village the first stop to Mars: ESA

Russian space agency, NASA agree to co-build lunar-orbit space station

NASA, Roscosmos Sign Joint Statement on Researching, Exploring Deep Space

CHIP TECH
Helicopter test for Jupiter icy moons radar

Solving the Mystery of Pluto's Giant Blades of Ice

Global Aerospace Corporation to present Pluto lander concept to NASA

Pluto features given first official names

CHIP TECH
MATISSE to Shed Light on the Formation of Earth and Planets

Glenn Tests Thruster Bound for Metal World

Searching for Distant Worlds With a Flying Telescope

Scientists propose new concept of terrestrial planet formation

CHIP TECH
Arianespace to launch COSMO-SkyMed satellites manufactured by Thales

New Zealand opens first rocket launch site

Arianespace signs contract for 10 Vega and Vega C launchers

Launch Vehicle and Missile Ascent Trajectories

CHIP TECH
China launches three satellites

Mars probe to carry 13 types of payload on 2020 mission

UN official commends China's role in space cooperation

China's cargo spacecraft separates from Tiangong-2 space lab

CHIP TECH
Studies of 'Crater Capital' in the Baltics Show Impactful History

Unexpected Surprise: A Final Image from Rosetta

Hubble Observes the Farthest Active Inbound Comet Yet Seen

NASA's Near-Earth Asteroid CubeSat Goes Full Sail




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement