Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
. Space Travel News .




EPIDEMICS
AIDS: Chinese study raises flag over drugs-as-prevention hope
by Staff Writers
Paris (AFP) Dec 01, 2012


A Chinese study published on World AIDS Day on Saturday says drugs used to curb HIV in infected people also help protect their uninfected partner, but far less effectively than other research has found.

The idea of using antiretrovirals to prevent HIV as well as treat it leapt into the headlines last year when researchers reported stellar results from trials in Africa, Asia and the United States.

In a careful experiment, they recruited 1,763 so-called "serodiscordant" couples, meaning one partner had HIV and the other was uninfected.

If the HIV patient was given antiretroviral drugs, this reduced the risk -- by a massive 96 percent, equal to the effectiveness of a condom -- of transmitting the virus to the partner, the investigators found.

Acting on this breakthrough, the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended that the infected partner in a "serodiscordant" couple be given antiretrovirals regardless of their count of CD4 immune cells, a benchmark for initiating treatment.

The new study, published in The Lancet, looked back at how Chinese "serodiscordant" couples have fared.

The importance here is that the conditions are real life, and different from medical trials where for ethical reasons, couples are regularly advised about safe sex and their health and wellbeing are more closely monitored.

Researchers led by Yiming Shao, a professor at the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention in Beijing, trawled through China's national HIV database.

They examined the state of more than 38,000 "serodiscordant" couples, who were followed for up to nine years, from 2003 to 2011.

Of this total, 24,000 of the couples were under treatment while 14,000 were not under treatment during the period they were studied.

Biannual HIV tests were given, and these were recorded along with other data such as how any HIV infection had occurred.

The team found that in the treatment group, protection against HIV for the non-infected partner was 26 percent -- a figure much lower than found in the big trial unveiled last year.

They also discovered that the protection only seemed to last for a year, after which transmission rates were comparable for both the treated and untreated groups of couples.

And treatment-as-prevention was not so effective when the HIV-positive partners were injected drugs or had very high CD4 cell counts.

Shao's team says that even with 26-percent effectiveness, the policy is still good.

But, they say, it also has limitations that depend on the type of patient, although further work is needed to get a fix on this problem.

"These results substantiate the previous evidence... that the treatment-as-prevention approach is a feasible public health prevention strategy on a national scale and in a developing country context," they write.

"It's possible that increasing rates of resistance to treatment in patients with high CD4 level, or decreasing adherence to treatment in patients injecting drugs, are contributing to the reduction in the protective benefit of treatment over time, but this, and other possibilities, will need further investigation."

The study coincided with World AIDS Day, which marks a pandemic that in 2011 claimed 1.7 million lives and led to 2.5 million new HIV infections, according to the latest UN figures.

The number of people living with HIV rose slightly last year to 34 million, up from 33.5 million in 2010, according to UNAIDS.

.


Related Links
Epidemics on Earth - Bird Flu, HIV/AIDS, Ebola






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





EPIDEMICS
China AIDS activists reject Li olive branch
Beijing (AFP) Nov 29, 2012
Chinese AIDS activists on Thursday accused the Communist Party's new number two Li Keqiang of hypocrisy after he called for more non-government efforts to fight the disease. The ruling party has long been suspicious of HIV/AIDS campaigners because of their refusal to support official policy, and activists accused Li - expected to become prime minister in March - of overseeing deliberate op ... read more


EPIDEMICS
S. Korea readies new bid to join global space club

Arianespace Lofts Pleiades 1B Using Soyuz Medium-lift launcher

Japan Schedules Radar Satellite Launch

Arianespace ready for next Soyuz and Ariane missions

EPIDEMICS
Opportunity Gets to Work on Interesting Rock Targets

Opportunity Gets To Work On Interesting Rock

Regional Dust Storm Dissipating

One Year After Launch, Curiosity Rover Busy on Mars

EPIDEMICS
WSU researchers use 3-D printer to make parts from moon rock

China's Chang'e-3 to land on moon next year

Moon crater yields impact clues

Study: Moon basin formed by giant impact

EPIDEMICS
Halfway Between Uranus and Neptune, New Horizons Cruises On

Dwarf planet Makemake lacks atmosphere

Keck Observations Bring Weather Of Uranus Into Sharp Focus

At Pluto, Moons and Debris May Be Hazardous to New Horizons Spacecraft During Flyby

EPIDEMICS
Brown Dwarfs May Grow Rocky Planets

Astronomers report startling find on planet formation

A Sky Full of Planets

Low-mass planets make good neighbours for debris discs

EPIDEMICS
Japan confesses data breach on Epsilon rocket

J-2X - Back in the Saddle Again

The Biggest Breakthrough In Propulsion Since The Jet Engine

Researchers test novel power system for space travel

EPIDEMICS
Mr Xi in Space

China plans manned space launch in 2013: state media

China to launch manned spacecraft

Tiangong 1 Parked And Waiting As Shenzhou 10 Mission Prep Continues

EPIDEMICS
Asteroid dust from space

Nine Radar Images of Asteroid 2007 PA8

DARPA's Advanced Space Surveillance Telescope Could Be Looking Up From Down Under

Comet collisions every 6 seconds explain 17-year-old stellar mystery




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement