Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Space Travel News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



2,500 Researchers, One Supermachine, One New Snapshot Of The Universe

Atlas.
by Staff Writers
Montreal, Canada (SPX) Apr 02, 2008
Deep in the bowels of the earth -100 metres below ground in Geneva, Switzerland - lies a supermachine of 27 km circumference called the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that has been built to unlock the mysteries of the universe.

Claude Leroy, a Universite de Montreal physics professor, was among the 2,500 scientists from 37 countries recruited to help design, test and build the ATLAS detector at the supermachine that will provide a new perspective into what occurred at the time of the Big Bang and immediately after.

Designed for CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, the ATLAS detector, the largest among the four detectors operating at the supermachine in question, is 46 metres in length, 25 metres in height and 7000 tonnes in weight - or the size of three football fields.

Prof. Leroy was responsible for the radiation and irradiation studies conducted to ensure the ATLAS detector will run smoothly. His investigations also led to the creation of MPX, a small device attached throughout the supermachine and ATLAS that uses pixel silicon detectors to perform real-time measurements of the spectral characteristics and composition of radiation inside and around the ATLAS detector.

The small devices essentially capture images of what's inside the detector and its environment, such neutrons and photons, a world-first.

He also participated in physics studies that targeted the production of heavy leptons, excited leptons, quarks and supersymmetry, in particular the study of neutralinos as dark matter candidates. Prof. Leroy's experiments were critical in ensuring the viability of the ATLAS detector at the core of the supermachine, which is the world's biggest particles physics detector.

Indeed, before the LHC can be started up, some 38,000 tons of equipment of the supermachine must be cooled down to minus 456 degrees Fahrenheit for the magnets to operate in a superconducting state. This will be achieved by using liquid helium for magnet.

Parts of the ATLAS calorimeters use liquid argon cooled at minus 312 degrees Fahrenheit. "The radiation field produced by the operation of the machine and ATLAS is stronger than a nuclear reactor, so it is vital that its design master all aspects of physics," said Prof. Leroy.

Supermachine's Big Bang
The LHC will recreate conditions akin to the Big Bang - which many scientists believe gave birth to the universe - by colliding two beams of particles at close to the speed of light. Since it is estimated that only 4 percent of the universe has been charted, the supermachine will help answer the following questions in physics when it is turned on in summer 2008:

- What is the unknown 96 percent of the universe made of?

- Why do particles have mass?

- Why does nature prefer matter over antimatter?

- What lies beyond Earth's dimension?

Related Links
ATLAS
CERN
University of Montreal
Understanding Time and Space



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


Why Matter Matters In The Universe
Melbourne, Australia (SPX) Mar 31, 2008
The latest research findings, which involved significant contributions from physicists at the University of Melbourne, have been recently published in the prestigious journal Nature. The paper reveals that investigation into the process of B-meson decays has given insight into why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe.







  • SpaceX Conducts First Three-Engine Firing Of Falcon 9 Rocket
  • European Space Truck Jules Verne In Parking Orbit
  • New Purdue Facility Aims To Improve NASA Moon Rocket Engine
  • Space X Falcon 9 Facing More Delays As Shuttle Replacement Looms

  • Zenit Rocket To Orbit Israeli Satellite In Late April
  • Successful Qualification Firing Test For Zefiro 23
  • German military satellite launched by Russia: report
  • Russian Rockot Launch Vehicle To Orbit European GOCE Satellite

  • NASA reschedules shuttle launch date
  • Shuttle Endeavour returns after record-setting mission to ISS
  • Endeavour Crew Prepares For Landing
  • Shuttle Endeavour's landing delayed at Cape Canaveral

  • European space freighter in dress rehearsal for ISS hookup
  • Crew Conducts Science, Preps For Jules Verne Docking
  • New ISS Crew To Conduct 47 Experiments At Space Station
  • South Korean Equipment Allowed To Be Used In Space Research

  • Japan recruits astronauts for first time in decade
  • Environmental Tectonics' NASTAR Center Sends Ninety-Six Space Cruise Participants To Space
  • Spaceport Sweden And Virgin Galactic Progress Plans For Space Journeys
  • Minister Jim Prentice Announces New Astronaut Search For Canada

  • China's space development can pose military threat: Japan
  • Cassini Tastes Organic Material At Saturn's Geyser Moon
  • China Approves Second-Phase Lunar Probe Program
  • Brazil To Deepen Space Cooperation With China

  • Toshiba robot can do the job of the remote control
  • Jules Verne Set For Next Step On Road To Automated Station Docking
  • High-Schoolers Go Into Overdrive At FIRST Robotics Competition
  • In Japan, robot babysitter always ready to play

  • For The Paper Trail Of Life On Mars Or Other Planets, Find Cellulose
  • Mars Robotic Rover Opportunity Finds More Evidence Of Ancient Water
  • Spirit Begins Preparing For Another Winter Hibernation
  • Wataire's Water-From-Air Units Get Thumbs Up In Mars Mission Simulation

  • The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright Space.TV Corporation. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space.TV Corp on any Web page published or hosted by Space.TV Corp. Privacy Statement